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Supplier Code of Conduct

This policy sets out Waste2Wear’s expectations for its current and potential suppliers.

1. Obey the law

Waste2Wear suppliers are expected to comply with all applicable laws, codes or regulations of the countries and territories in which they operate. This includes, but is not limited to, laws and regulations relating to environmental, occupational health and safety, data privacy, and labour practices. Waste2Wear’s suppliers must require their suppliers (including temporary labour agencies) to do the same.

2. Conduct business with integrity

WaSuppliers are expected to conduct their businesses in accordance with the highest standards of ethical behavior and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. Suppliers are expected to conform to these requirements in each of the following areas:

  1. Fair Trade Practices. Suppliers shall not engage in collusive bidding, price fixing, price discrimination or other unfair trade practices.

  2. NBribery, Kickbacks and Fraud. No funds or assets of the supplier shall be paid, loaned or otherwise disbursed as bribes, “kickbacks”, or other payments designed to influence or compromise the conduct of Waste2Wear, its employees or representatives, or connected with Waste2Wear’s business in any way.

3. Protect Waste2Wear’s information, assets, and interests

Suppliers are expected to respect intellectual property rights including those of Waste2Wear, its affiliates, customers and business partners, and take appropriate steps to safeguard and maintain confidential and proprietary information of Waste2Wear, its affiliates, customers and business partners, and use such information only for the purposes specified by Waste2Wear. Suppliers are expected to observe and respect all Waste2Wear’s and its affiliates, customers and business partners’ know how, patents, trademarks and copyrights and comply with all requirements as to their use as established by Waste2Wear; and keep all confidential and/or proprietary information of Waste2Wear secure. Internet systems, networks and transmissions should be secured, including using encryption and anti-virus protections, in accordance with good security standards.

4. Environmental Practices

Suppliers are expected to comply with all environmental laws and regulations applicable to their operations.

5. Occupational Health and Safety Practices

Suppliers are expected to provide their employees with a safe and healthy working environment. Suppliers must prevent accidents and injury to health arising out of, linked with, or occurring in the course of work or as a result of the operation of the supplier.

Suppliers must provide among other things:

  1. Occupational health and safety training;

  2. A system for injury and illness reporting; and

  3. Medical treatment and/or compensation to injured/ill workers arising as a result of working for Supplier.

In addition,

  1. Worker exposure to physically demanding tasks, including manual material handling and heavy lifting, prolonged standing and highly repetitive or forceful tasks is to be identified, evaluated and controlled;

  2. Workers are to be provided clean and safe facilities including clean toilet facilities, access to potable water and sanitary food preparation and storage facilities, and

  3. Worker dormitories provided by the Suppliers are to be clean, safe, and provide emergency egress, adequate heat and ventilation and reasonable personal space.

6. Treat people with dignity and respect

Waste2Wear expects its suppliers to adopt sound labour practices and treat their workers fairly in accordance with the United Nations’ Universal Declaration on Human Rights, International Labour Organisation’s conventions (the SA8000 Standard), local laws and regulations; and comply with the following principles:

  1. Freely Chosen Employment. Not use any forced labour, whether in the form of prison labor, indentured labor, bonded labor or otherwise.

  2. No Child Labour. Comply with local minimum working age laws and requirements and not employ child labour.

  3. Minimum Wages. Provide wages for regular and overtime work and benefits that meet or exceed legal requirements.

  4. Working Hours. Suppliers shall not require workers to work more than the maximum hours of daily labour set by local laws.

  5. No Harsh, Inhumane Treatment or Abuse. Treat each employee with dignity and respect, and workers shall not be subject to threats of violence, physical punishment, confinement or other form of physical, sexual, psychological or verbal harassment or abuse.

  6. No Discrimination. Not discriminate in its employment practices on the basis of race, colour, religion, sex, age, physical disability, national origin, creed or any other basis prohibited by law.

  7. Freedom of Association. Recognize and respect the rights of its workers to join or to refrain from joining associations of their own choosing and the right to collective bargaining in accordance with local labour laws and established practices.

Waste2Wear suppliers are expected to comply with all applicable laws, codes or regulations of the countries and territories in which they operate. This includes, but is not limited to, laws and regulations relating to environmental, occupational health and safety, data privacy, and labour practices. Waste2Wear’s suppliers must require their suppliers (including temporary labour agencies) to do the same.

Suppliers are expected to conduct their businesses in accordance with the highest standards of ethical behavior and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. Suppliers are expected to conform to these requirements in each of the following areas:

  1. Fair Trade Practices. Suppliers shall not engage in collusive bidding, price fixing, price discrimination or other unfair trade practices.

  2. Bribery, Kickbacks and Fraud. No funds or assets of the supplier shall be paid, loaned or otherwise disbursed as bribes, “kickbacks”, or other payments designed to influence or compromise the conduct of Waste2Wear, its employees or representatives, or connected with Waste2Wear’s business in any way.

Suppliers are expected to respect intellectual property rights including those of Waste2Wear, its affiliates, customers and business partners, and take appropriate steps to safeguard and maintain confidential and proprietary information of Waste2Wear, its affiliates, customers and business partners, and use such information only for the purposes specified by Waste2Wear. Suppliers are expected to observe and respect all Waste2Wear’s and its affiliates, customers and business partners’ know how, patents, trademarks and copyrights and comply with all requirements as to their use as established by Waste2Wear; and keep all confidential and/or proprietary information of Waste2Wear secure. Internet systems, networks and transmissions should be secured, including using encryption and anti-virus protections, in accordance with good security standards.

Suppliers are expected to comply with all environmental laws and regulations applicable to their operations.

Suppliers are expected to provide their employees with a safe and healthy working environment. Suppliers must prevent accidents and injury to health arising out of, linked with, or occurring in the course of work or as a result of the operation of the supplier.

Suppliers must provide among other things:

  1. Occupational health and safety training;

  2. A system for injury and illness reporting; and

  3. Medical treatment and/or compensation to injured/ill workers arising as a result of working for Supplier.

In addition,

  1. Worker exposure to physically demanding tasks, including manual material handling and heavy lifting, prolonged standing and highly repetitive or forceful tasks is to be identified, evaluated and controlled;

  2. Workers are to be provided clean and safe facilities including clean toilet facilities, access to potable water and sanitary food preparation and storage facilities, and

  3. Worker dormitories provided by the Suppliers are to be clean, safe, and provide emergency egress, adequate heat and ventilation and reasonable personal space.
Waste2Wear expects its suppliers to adopt sound labour practices and treat their workers fairly in accordance with the United Nations’ Universal Declaration on Human Rights, International Labour Organisation’s conventions (the SA8000 Standard), local laws and regulations; and comply with the following principles:

  1. Freely Chosen Employment. Not use any forced labour, whether in the form of prison labor, indentured labor, bonded labor or otherwise.

  2. No Child Labour. Comply with local minimum working age laws and requirements and not employ child labour.

  3. Minimum Wages. Provide wages for regular and overtime work and benefits that meet or exceed legal requirements.

  4. Working Hours. Suppliers shall not require workers to work more than the maximum hours of daily labour set by local laws.

  5. No Harsh, Inhumane Treatment or Abuse. Treat each employee with dignity and respect, and workers shall not be subject to threats of violence, physical punishment, confinement or other form of physical, sexual, psychological or verbal harassment or abuse.

  6. No Discrimination. Not discriminate in its employment practices on the basis of race, colour, religion, sex, age, physical disability, national origin, creed or any other basis prohibited by law.

  7. Freedom of Association. Recognize and respect the rights of its workers to join or to refrain from joining associations of their own choosing and the right to collective bargaining in accordance with local labour laws and established practices.
Waste2Wear Code of Conduct: Revised April 2023

Sven Bleekemolen

Sven Bleekemolen is a Dutch entrepreneur and textile engineer. He is a versatile executive with a broad skill set and experience in a global marketplace. Lived and worked in Europe, Indonesia, and Turkey. Solid expertise in management of start-up to mature fashion companies in competitive wholesale and retail markets.

In his role as director of several companies, Sven built strong knowledge of international wholesale, retail, B2B sales, production and brand development. He has a strategic and innovative mindset, always focused on business development. He has a record of identifying opportunities and leading diverse teams to surpass revenue goals.

Sven has a strong focus on sustainability and is excited to discover the possibilities that lie in Waste2Wear’s groundbreaking material and blockchain technologies. He is committed to creating a major contribution to the business performance of Waste2Wear along with the transition to a more circular economy for a better outcome of the world.

Hein Barnhoorn

Olivier van Migem

Ruma Kinger

Rena Jiang

Rena Jiang has over 20 years experience in the textile industry. Knowing how polluting the industry is, Rena is proud to be making a positive impact by doing the right thing with Waste2Wear.

Christophe Marze

Christophe Marze has over 15 years specializing in structuring and powering up businesses in Asia. As a French national, he has spent many years living and working in Germany and in China. Christophe is passionate about continuous improvement, sustainability and compliance which are from him the pillars of a healthy business drive.

Jeroen van der Wind

Jeroen van der Wind is an entrepreneur, specializing in international trade within the textile and promotional industries in South East Asia for over three decades. He was managing partner of The Cookie Company for many years, producing licensed kids apparel for several multinational customers. In combination with a healthy business drive, he is determined to help further the Waste2Wear mission of relieving the planet of the plastic problem to create a better world, especially for his four adult children.

Eduardo Garza Garcia

Eduardo Garza Garcia is a Mexican designer and entrepreneur specializing in sustainable solutions for plastics. He has been pivotal in innovations including the industry-first recycled polypropylene (RPP) from discarded domestic appliances; a unique RPET verification method (RA-3) proving the recycled plastic content in materials and the industry-first blockchain technology. Thanks to his innovations, Waste2Wear has won several prestigious environmental awards. Eduardo is truly an innovator in the world of recycled plastics constantly working for new ways to bring more transparency to the recycling industry.

Stefan Kleijkamp

Stefan Kleijkamp is a highly experienced Global Quality and Compliance Manager with over 15 years of experience in the industry. Originally from the Netherlands, Stefan has spent the last two decades working in Asia, with 17 of those years in China. He is fluent in Chinese and has worked with a wide range of product groups including textile, apparel, hard goods and plastics. Throughout his career, Stefan has held positions in quality and compliance management for both large and medium sized companies, as well as in purchasing and logistics. His extensive experience has given him a deep understanding of the challenges and issues facing the industry, particularly in relation to traceability of recycled materials such as textile, cotton and polyester. With his expertise in quality and compliance, Stefan is dedicated to ensuring that the products and services provided by Waste2Wear meet the highest standards in quality, sustainability and environmental responsibility.

Monique Maissan

Monique Maissan is a Dutch entrepreneur and textile engineer specializing in sustainable solutions for the industry. As CEO and founder of Waste2Wear, she leads a committed team in creating products and services for a better future. Her vision has driven the company to produce fabrics and products made from recycled plastic bottles (RPET) and recycled polypropylene (RPP) plus award winning blockchain and RPET verification test RA-3.

Monique has won several industry awards, most recently:

Finalist of “Future Leader” World Sustainability Awards 2022;
“Outstanding Achiever” of Global Green Economic Forum, Women Eco Game Changer Awards 2022;
“Woman Leader in Plastic Recycling” Plastic Recycling Conference Asia** 2022;
“The Sustainable Entrepreneur of the Year” of Entrepreneurs’ Organization*** 2021.

She is constantly on the lookout for new and better ways to recycle more plastic. Monique’s drive comes from her determination to do her part to leave this world in a better place for her two adult children and all of the next generation